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Carte Nouvelle des Posséssions Angloises en Amérique dressée pour l'intelligence de la guerre présente et divisée suivant les prétentions des Anglais...

Carte Nouvelle des Posséssions Angloises en Amérique dressée pour l'intelligence de la guerre présente et divisée suivant les prétentions des Anglais...

$3,000.00

M.Antoine Moithey

Published 1780, Paris


Size: 27.5" X 19.5"


Description:

A beautiful and rare first state map with original color depicting the American and British colonies on the East coast of North America at the onset of the American Revolution. Inset is a map of the Atlantic trade routes to North America from European ports.  These include the Route de Rochefort, The Route du Havre, the Route de Nantes, the Route de Brest, the Route de Cadis and the Route de Lisbonne.
It has been argued that broadside maps such as this one, became an importance source of cartographic information to the Americans as the supply of maps and other goods were closed off during the British Naval blockades.  As such, as indicated in the title, this map was based on the work of Thomas Jefferys most likely from the maps found in The American Atlas: Or A Geographical Description of the Whole Continent of America that was first published by Sayer and Bennett in 1775.  Jefferys work is considered “one of the most authoritative and comprehensive atlases of America” (W. Ristow).  It is further argued by Ristow that the American Atlas “as a major cartographic reference work it was, very likely, consulted by American, English, and French civilian administrators and military officers during the Revolution.”
Moithey’s map also includes annotations that describe the historical context in which the different North American colonies were founded.  It also notes the native Five Nations that include the Mohawks, the Onidos, the Onondawgaws, the Kasyowgaws and the Senckas and Tulkarorahs.
Moithey’s depiction provides an impressive amount of cartographic information as it relates to the different colonial boundaries including forts and native villages as well as bestowing important topographical detail in what would become an important theatre of military conflict during the American Revolution.
Sources:Ristow, W., Thomas Jefferys The American Atlas London 1776, Amsterdam 1974.  Sellers & Van Ee #155.)